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Jason White
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PostSubject: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Thu 10 Mar 2016 - 20:46

Compiled by Alberto Ibañez Very Happy  :chinois:


Since many people here are new to oval racing, I have compiled this text about it where you can find the most relevant info you need to speed up the process of learning it.

Believe me, it's great racing -just different from road raicng- and once you are hooked you will always love to race again on circles.

For our HSO community, knowing how to race on ovals and enjoy it also expands the possible races and championships we can do, which is always a good thing.

I will upload a setup for each race to the web, for those who need one.

Have fun and if you have any questions just ask :hello:

Quote :
/////////// TIPS FOR OVAL RACING: ////////////

GENERAL:

Think of an oval track as a magnifying glass. Whatever part of racing you consider (set-up, racing line, smoothness, errors), it's effects are exaggerated on an oval, but there are four things that stand out:

1) In road races you have to make compromises for the variety of turns. Not so in an oval. Because you have few turns and all are to the left, you can come  closer to perfection on the setup for any given corner, which means that a small difference in your car will be a deciding factor. A great driver on a road track can make up for the deficits in his car, on ovals this is simply not possible.

2) Second, because the speeds are generally high (The turns at a short track like Milwaukee are faster than the fastest turns on most road tracks) you don't have a problem with throttle control but instead your main objetive is to keep your speed and not scrubbing it off. The importance of smoothness is extreme.

3) Third, the nature of the ovals makes the cars race closer together, and therefore you will be mostly in heavy traffic with cars around you. This means having to know and trust the other guy racing near you, and being able to place your car accurately on the track. You also must learn to live with the aero effects the cars around you will produce.

4) Finally, you must be aware that you are racing on a track enclosed by walls. That means that an oval can, and in fact usually is, a very unforgiving enviroment, especially with open wheel cars. The penalty for errors here is usually not simply losing positions but slamming the wall and retiring.


GAME OPTIONS:

1) Graphics:

- Cars spinning at high speeds cause lots of smoke, which is dangerous. Reduce the special effects detail to see better.

- Reduce the details of the cars if needed, but allow as many visible ones as possible. You can see very far in ovals, and it is important to plan what you will be doing in the nex hunderds of metres because you will be getting there REALLY fast.

2) Sounds:

It is very important that you configure your sound options correctly. You must activate the spotter and also set it to maximum detail/content. That will give you these very important reports when driving in traffic that allow you to be more aware of what is going around you:

Car outside: means a car is on your right side
Car inside: means a car is on your left side
Three-wide in the middle: means you have a car at each side
Still there: The car he warned you about is still running on your side
Clear: You have nobody around and can change lanes if needed

3) Misc:

- Change your speed units to MPH. With Km/h the numbers go up and down very fast and it is more difficult to be aware of the speed you are doing at a given moment. It might ultimately not be as precise, but it gives you more awareness, which matters most.

- Get a decent HUD plug in, simple and uncluttered but effective. You want a good fuel consumption/lap predictor.

GENERAL DRIVING:

- You have to be SMOOTH and PATIENT

- Your main objective is to carry as much speed through the corner as possible. Use your apex speeds as a reference to know if you are going faster or not.

- Think of your steering wheel and your throttle as the sides of a balance (Steering wheel is left and Thottle is right): When you turn the steering wheel, the left side goes down and the right side goes up (You lift throttle). On turn exit you do the opposite and apply thottle as you center the steering wheel.

- Your steering wheel is a brake: Turn it as less as possible, just what is needed to point the car where you want to go. Do NOT jerk around with the steering wheel, it scrubs speed off and overheats the tires.

- You not only steer with the steering wheel but also with the throttle. At the same steering wheel position, cutting gas will make the car go down and point into the turn, while giving gas will push it up to the wall.

- Do NOT, NEVER stare at the car in front or to the corner apex. Alternate your look and ALWAYS be aware of the turn exit location, even when you are entering the turn. Ovals require a smoothness you will only get if you point the car right already when entering the turn. You must know where your car will end the turn, it is important because there is a HARD WALL there, so you better be sure you end your turn some cms before it. Use your peripheral vision to control everything else while checking your overall path through the corner.

- Scrubbing speed through an error will make the other cars dissapear quickly in the horizon. Don't get angry, keep your calm and concentrate in being smooth. If you start overdriving the gap will grow, if you run smooth you will catch them back sooner than you think.

THE RACING LINE:

- Because the turns are fast, your priority is not just accelerating quicker at the exit, but doing it from the already fastest speed possible. That means carrying more speed through the apex.

- Think of the ball rolling around freely in a roulette as you see in a Casino. Your car must go around the corner like that: constant, smooth, effortless, FAST.

- The technique is as follows: When you arrive at your entry point, you already look to the EXIT, to the point you expect your car to end the turn. Do NOT look to the apex directly. Look to the turn finish point, turn your steering wheel smoothly to aim the car there, connecting in a gentle curved line the apex with that point. Form then on, use throttle (Not the steering wheel) -and if necessary slight brake on turn entry- to ensure the car STAYS pointed to that exit mark.

1) Turn in:

- The turn in point is earlier than on road courses. Do NOT try to brake late and turn the car around to straighten the apex-exit line for harder acceleration. You will kill the tires and be slower.

- If you can put your left front wheel inside the white line easily, you are not going into the turn fast enough

- If your car slides a lane to the right, you entered too fast

2) The Apex:

- The apex is LONG, not just a point but more an area, and there can be several seconds where you have to go with constant half throttle and the steering wheel turned full, hugging the inside. Be sure to add enough throttle to keep the speed in that zone. One of the rookie errors is to continue losing speed at that part of the turn, until the point you start exiting the corner.

- Some long and fast turns can have double apex.

3) The Exit:

- Applying throttle at exit is done progressively. Do not worry if you stand for an -apparently- long time at 3/4 and can't press the pedal full. It is faster to do an apex at 162 MPH and go out 3/4 throttle to 175 MPH than doing the (long) apex at 158 MPH and go out full throttle to reach the same 175 MPH

- If you slide up to the wall at the exit or your steering wheel is still turned to the left trying to avoid the wall, you gave throttle too soon or too much.

Finally, be aware that oval racing is many times tri-dimensional racing. When the track has enough banking, you can not just go left and right but also up and down. When you go up a lane you go faster but on a longer distance (Same elapsed time). It is useful to pass, to defend, and to let others pass. Remember that going up means you store energy (Gravity) and therefore when going down again you will do it faster.

NOT ALL tracks allow this. Homestead for example has mostly flat turns with little banking and there is just one main line to race, even if the track might seem very wide.

One last advice: The turns are never equal, not even in apparently symmetrical ovals. There are subtle differencies and you must learn them because they do affect your laptimes. A bump, a minor banking change, a different transition from straight to turn, the wind getting you faster in one direction and slower in the opposite, whatever. In some triovals the differences are quite big and you must compromise one turn (Usually the slowest one, were there is less to be gained).

EMERGENCY SITUATIONS:

- To prevent hitting the wall at corner exit, do not turn the steering more or hit the brake, just lift the throttle, but do it smoothly. An abrupt lift will unsettle the car and complicate things even more. It even might cause a spin because your front tires were too turned to the left and sliding, hence if they regain grip suddenly you will oversteer against the wall.

- If you have to hit the wall, be sure to do it sideways, not with the front corner or the rear.  

- If you lose the rear and spin, do NOT try to counter steer. It can cause a sudden response launching the car against the wall front-end first.

- If you have still some control try to bring the car low, the grass in the infield is softer than the wall on the outside

- When you see a car spinning in front of you, go HIGH. Gravity will normally take the spinning car down to the infield. If is close, aim for the car and hold the trajectory, do not react to whatever the spinning car does: when you arrive there he will be gone.

CAR SETUP:

- You WILL know when the car is rightly setup. It will run freely through the corner with easyness, like the roulette ball example. No matter if that is not the fastest configuration, it is what you want for the race. You can use something quicker and not so nice for the qualy, but don't be a fool when choosing your race setup.

- If you have no idea about how to setup a car, get a setup from someone who does. It is not easy, and for ovals it is even more difficult. You will gain more if you dedicate your time to improve your driving.

- Do not judge the car in cold tires. Warm them up nicely. With hard speedway tires this takes some laps. Do NOT charge into the corners and overheat the right front tire or you will never be able to evaluate your setup because the most important tire will be giving wrong feedback.

- As a general rule, open wheelers are aero cars and you must ensure you have the most stable aero platform possible. Raising the right side a bit when compared to the left will make it corner horizontally when it leans into the corner, which helps the underbody generate downforce. using slightly stiffer springs on the right will also work well. Same for tire pressure, you want some more on the right side ones.

- The small speedway wings do not always have enough downforce to balance the car. If it understeers too much, raise the rear a bit to move the centre of pressure forwards and balance the car (Do it in 1mm increments each time). ALWAYS ensure your car is balanced with no more than "4" or "5" in the front wing. If you have to set the front wing to the maximum to balance the car, you have no margin for adjusting the balance during a pit stop and you will run the whole race with a car you do not like.

- Banking has lots of effect in compressing the springs and bottoming. Flat tracks will accept much softer suspensions.

- The correct order to setup an indycar for ovals is:

1) Find the ride height you can get away with. You do this by trial and error starting the car with race fuel load as low as possible and then adding spring till it doesn't bottom any more on turns. If you have to add too much spring raise the car slightly. Try to always rise the rear instead of the front.

2) Balance the car with front wing, no more than setting "4".  

3) Fine tune the balance with antiroll bars. The front one will affect turn entry (stiffer=more understeer but more stability), the rear one traction at turn exit (Softer= more understeer but better traction). For slow tracks you need some more traction, for fast ones you want stiffer rear bar. In any case, be moderate with antiroll bars because they transfer weight in the wrong direction. You will be losing mechanical grip with them, hence soften them if they compromise the aero part of the car.

4) When in doubt, go for balance instead of laptimes. A slightly faster car that is tyring to drive will not pay off in a race. Be sure you are comfortable with the car even if you think you are slow. When you get it right on an oval (Your driving + Correct setup) you will feel that you can lap for hours without getting tired.

- The underbody generates less drag than the wings, but still does. On the superfast tracks you will want to raise the car because you have enough grip for the open turns and want instead less suction/drag. That will also allow you to use softer springs for better mechanical grip.

- Tire temps are your best telemetry. Use camber and pressure to get uniform ones, with the inner side lightly hotter on right side tires. For the left side ones try to get a uniform temperature all around. If your tires are happy, you will be fast.

- Racing close to the car in front will cause understeer. Take this into account on your setup for race start and later on pitstops. If you start in the middle of the pack on fast speedways you will want some more oversteer to compensate till the cars space and you can run clear. In the first pitstop you can then substract front wing angle and get normal balance back.

- Steering angle: Use as little as possible and configure it so that you turn your steering wheel exactly 90º left on the apex of the slowest turn. That will help you being constant and noticing the differences between laps because you will program your brain quicker to turn that much the wheel and can concentrate in other things.

YELLOW FLAGS, STARTING AND RESTARTING:

- You can use your pit speed limiter as cruise control during yellow flags. Place yourself behind the car you must follow, at the distance you think is OK and activate the limiter to cruise behind it.

- Ideally you must not be directly behind the other guy but instead offset to one side. That allows the following car to also see better and improves safety.

- Keep "vehicle labels" on at all times (TAB key by default). On restarts the car in front of you should be highlighted in yellow (Including the Safety Car). If you are following someone whose label is in white, then you are in the wrong position.

- Waving, accelerating, braking or doing any of that nonsense to heat tires will not work while cruising under yellow, nor is it necessary. The hard speedway tires will not heat much from doing that at slow speeds, and the correct start is done when already at racing speeds.

- In the starts/restarts you need to be very careful with the lack of grip at reduced speeds and when using speedway wings. You must restart on a long gear and pick speed smoothly, only giving full throttle once you are fast enough.

- This is not a standing start, do not try to accelerate violently.  The pack is intended to hold formation while picking speed smoothly until they are at racing speeds, and then go real racing once they pass the start line.

OVERTAKING:

- Because the turn in point is earlier (You have less space on the inside), the apex long, and there is no heavy braking before the turns, overtaking is different than in a road track.  

- You pass on turn entry only if you got in the straight already forward of the other car’s half before the turn-in point.

- You can pass on the inside by the apex if the other guy got in too fast and slides up but you held your trajectory well.

- You can pass on the exit by drag-racing the other guy to the next corner if you got a better turn exit. For that to work, you must trick him into protecting his inside making him believe you are passing on the apex, so that he chokes his turn exit, but staying yourself higher for a late apex and quicker acceleration out (Yes, the “incorrect” road racing style. It works here only because the other guy lost the same speed trying to block you but is in a worse position to accelerate his way out). This is the main way of passing at short tracks. You will be at his inside and parallel by the next corner turn in, and will take position. This leads many observers to believe (wrongly) that the pass was a genuine “going in” pass, while in fact it really happened the turn before.

- Most of this is valid for lapping cars

GETTING LAPPED:

- As a general rule, do not try anything different than what you are already doing. The faster car got you, and it’s his business to go around you. Because he is faster, he will probably be able to do it.

- Follow your usual line but do not come as close to the inside of the turn if he goes under you (On your left). You will need to go a bit slower for that to work, but just a tiny bit will suffice.

- At all moments, concentrate in your trajectory, it is VERY easy to watch the passing car and go against the wall at turn exit because you missed your turning points and went out of your path.

- Remember that the use of the throttle is counter-intuitive here: Adding gas and steering lock will not bring you down to the inside of the turn but the opposite. As strange as it might seem, if a car is passing you on your left and space is tight, giving a bit more throttle will make you move to the right with the same steering lock. It is NOT a good idea to move the steering wheel too much, it will throw you completely out of your trajectory and you will pay for it at turn exit. Give some gas to move out and immediately cut again to go low, the faster guy will get through if the timing is correct.

- You might get passed on the outside at certain tracks, when the banking is steep. In that case, be sure to get even closer to the inside of the turn, but do not change lanes.

- If you are slow in a straight and a car approaches fast, do not move, hold straight and he will avoid you. The best drivers anticipate a lot and will see you and make evident the side they intend to pass, but keeping on straight line will never work bad. It is the overtaking car’s duty to do it safely.

STRATEGY:

- Engines have different fuel consumption characteristics, but there isn't always much to gain from running more boost. Running lower boost and lower fuel load will pay off over a whole race as it makes the tires life easier. But your driving will also do a lot, it is easy to cook the front right.

- In the first laps there will be the most accidents during starts and restarts, which clears the field. The middle part of the race when cars are more spread apart is the safest. Finally, when drivers are tired or trying to get position towards the end, you can get some more yellow flags.

- Real teams usually pit under yellow when they have less than 1/2 tank of fuel. Otherwise they prefer to stay out for track position. Consider the guy in front and behind you when deciding what to do. If you are behind a slow but difficult to pass guy, it might pay off to pit for fuel.

- You can opt to change only right side tires on pitstops. It is faster and sometimes the left side ones will take a second stint, specially if it is a short one to the chequered flag.

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Ludovic Tiengou
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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Fri 11 Mar 2016 - 19:39

Nice tips🔝 .

Now I know why I'll never be good at this serie. I'm neither a smooth driver nor a patient one :D . I'm also dreadfully unskilled in setup geek
Well it doen't matter. Knowing that I'll just have one objective then: try to see the checkered as many time as possible (two on third races would be a great thing).

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Fri 11 Mar 2016 - 19:45

Ludovic Tiengou wrote:
I'll just have one objective then: try to see the checkered as many time as possible (two on third races would be a great thing).

Ludovic, one thing to keep in mind when setting up the car is that it will change a lot over the course of the race.  Each car carries 75 gallons of fuel (284 liters), which is an insane amount.  As that fuel burns away, the car's personality changes drastically.  So you have to setup the car to be a compromise between full and empty tanks.  A strategy like this will definitely help you achieve a good finishing rate.

Ideally, the car should understeer a bit on a full tank, be evenly balanced on half a tank, and oversteer a bit when out of fuel.  Hope that is helpful info.

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Alberto Ibañez
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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Fri 11 Mar 2016 - 19:55

Quote :
Now I know why I'll never be good at this serie. I'm neither a smooth driver nor a patient one . I'm also dreadfully unskilled in setup
Well it doen't matter. Knowing that I'll just have one objective then: try to see the checkered as many time as possible (two on third races would be a great thing).

Try to pick an Eagle 72, they are the most in the field and there is always someone who will share setups Smile

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Sat 12 Mar 2016 - 15:52

Alberto Ibañez wrote:


Try to pick an Eagle 72, they are the most in the field and there is always someone who will share setups Smile

Thanks but it's not really the car I'm found of.

Quote :
Ideally, the car should understeer a bit on a full tank, be evenly balanced on half a tank, and oversteer a bit when out of fuel. Hope that is helpful info.

Thanks for the advise :hello:

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Sun 13 Mar 2016 - 3:05

I would like to expand on race strategy pertaining to yellows.

If you are starting near the very back of the grid, and there is a yellow early on, say five to ten laps into the race, it can be strategically smart to pit under yellow and top off the tank.  You may emerge from the pits in last or close to last, but you will not have lost much time to the pack, and you will have extended your pit window for later in the race, which could give you an advantage.

Pitting under yellow is ALWAYS preferable to pitting under green. If you come in under yellow, the cars on track are moving at a crawl, you lose much less time, and the pack stays bunched up.  If you pit under green, you lose an amazing amount of ground as cars whip by at race speed.  At some superspeedways, a second in the pits under green can equate to 100 yards on the track.  So if a yellow comes out between normal pit stops, you may choose to pit early, gambling that the race will be green at the next pit window.

Restarts (coming back to green flag racing) present an interesting opportunity to catch a car in front of you "sleeping" -- meaning you hang back, gain momentum before the green, and slip by as the field enters turn 1.  Keep in mind that cars can overtake before they cross the s/f line on the start and restarts as long as the green flag is being displayed (green to the front is green to the field, regardless of where the cars are).

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Sun 13 Mar 2016 - 19:35

I've a bunch of questions about the mod.

Is there a difference between Goodyear and Firestone tyres?

And for Firestone what are the difference between the four types of tyres availables? 0.5 seems to be faster than the 1.5 but wears faster. Is that correct?

Is it possible to modified the turbo boost in-race?

How to change the boost between qualifications and race without exiting the server?

I'm starting already to drown in setting up the Chevy. Assymetrical set up is something very special and I don't understand how to manage the changes. Must I just modified left? right? both?

Seems I need both a qualification set and a race one. No way to just have one for both?

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Sun 13 Mar 2016 - 19:42

Ludovic Tiengou wrote:
IIs there a difference between Goodyear and Firestone tyres?

Yes, from what I understand, the Goodyears drop off gradually, whereas the Firestones have more consistent grip for longer, then suddenly go away. The 0.5 v 1.5 numbers you are citing are the stagger (that is the circumference difference from one side to the other, which helps the car turn left).

Ludovic Tiengou wrote:
Is it possible to modified the turbo boost in-race?

No.

Ludovic Tiengou wrote:
How to change the boost between qualifications and race without exiting the server?

Everyone will exit the server during warmup and switch to race boost, then the admin will input the grid manually using gridedit.ini  Having one setup for qualy and race will not be ideal.

Ludovic Tiengou wrote:
Assymetrical set up is something very special and I don't understand how to manage the changes.

The main asymmetrical features are in stagger, caster, camber and springs.  They are setup this way to aid in turning left.  Positive camber on the left tires and negative on the right tires is a typical setup for ovals. You can also set the wing stagger in the front before you log onto the server.

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Sun 13 Mar 2016 - 20:01

The default setups are good enough that if you are not familiar with setting up a car for ovals you can just get the car to work for you using wings and roll bars. The single most important thing in all the setup is the front wing, which will cause understeer or oversteer easily. Set your rear wing for the best compromise of speed/grip and then adjust the front wing until the car behaves as you want. You can soften or stiffen the rear roll bar for more understeer/oversteer.

The higher stagger will help you in corner entry and mid-corner but the car will want to keep turning to the left when you exit, especially under throttle. Use only as much as doesnt compromise corner exit.

Quote :
Yes, from what I understand, the Goodyears drop off gradually, whereas the Firestones have more consistent grip for longer, then suddenly go away. The 0.5 v 1.5 numbers you are citing are the stagger (that is the circumference difference from one side to the other, which helps the car turn left).

The Firestones mantain the initial grip better than the Goodyears until 1/3 degradation, then drop below the Goodyears for the other 2/3 of their life. There is not a huge difference, but there is one.

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Mon 14 Mar 2016 - 12:26

Thanks for the answer :hello:

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Mon 14 Mar 2016 - 13:07

In any case don't be fooled by top speeds, that will not matter as much here.

Please note that coming out of a turn with higher wing at 150 MPH and peaking at 180 at the end of the straight is FASTER than coming out of the turn with low wing at 145 MPH and peaking at 185 at the end of the straight.

Your average is better, even if seems counter-intuitive. And also, top speed is actually a factor of how fast you come out of the turn. Even if you have less drag, in the example above you might run out of track to gain those 40 MPH difference versus only 30 MPH with the high wing.

Last, don't forget the slipstream. If you are able to follow another car closer trhough a turn, you can use the slipstream to overtake on the straight, and because you are faster than him in the next turn, he will be far back when you get out and make getting the position back harder.

That is the reason why f.e. at Trenton you always want to overtake at the finish line, because you have then the kink to the right that helps you losing the car you left behind. Wink

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Wed 16 Mar 2016 - 15:44

For those of you who are new to asymmetric setups:



Stagger

Those of you who are not familiar with stagger will find it a bit odd, but this has been a critical component of oval racing for a long time. Essentially, stagger is the difference in tire circumference from one side of the car to the other.  The more stagger, the more the car will want to "drive" into the corner. Adding or reducing stagger can have a significant impact on a car's handling. For example, if your car is understeering too much, increasing the stagger may loosen the back end up a bit and thus lessen the understeer.  On the other hand, if a car is too loose in the corners, reducing stagger could help stabilize the rear end.  Like a lot of things in oval racing, it's a question of balance.  Stagger will become very important on short ovals, where the turns are tight and handling is more important than raw speed. One side-effect of stagger is that the car will want to pull left in a straight line. This is normal, and oval drivers usually hold the steering wheel at a "12:30" position on straightaways.




Camber

In road course racing, it is common to have some amount of negative camber on all the wheels.  In oval racing, the left side tires can be deliberately set with positive camber; this causes the car to gain grip in corners by maximizing the amount of tire-to-track contact. Typically the camber on the front is more dramatic than the camber on the rear, but experimenting with this balance can help cure an understeering or oversteering car.  Like stagger, camber will be even more critical at shorter ovals. Those who set their cars up right will be able to cleanly enter and exit the tight turns, while others fight the car and lose time.

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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Wed 16 Mar 2016 - 18:18

Glossary of Oval Racing Terms
   
Apron - The paved (and usually flat) portion of a racetrack that separates the racing surface from the infield. Generally, a concrete wall or steel guardrail separates the apron from the infield.

Blower - Slang for a turbocharger.

Boost - Manifold intake pressure above ambient atmospheric pressure.

Bullring - A short oval. Example: Phoenix International Raceway.

Camber - Degree to which right-side tires lean in toward the car (from the top of the tire) and the left-side tires lean out. A useful tool to gain grip in corners by maximizing the amount of tire-to-track contact.

Clean Air - Air that is not spoiled by a car cutting through it.  This is the most ideal air for producing downforce.

Cruise Gear - A high gear that is reserved for following other cars in a slipstream. It produces less revolutions per minute than a race gear, so the engine will not over-rev in a slipstream. This gear can also be used as a fuel saving measure. Also known as "overdrive."

Dirty Air - Turbulent air that a car leaves in its wake. This air usually causes loss of downforce for cars following closely.

Holeshot - Slang term for a driver having the strongest start to get up to racing speed.

Lag - The acceleration delay that occurs when a turbocharger is not fully spooled up.  

Loose - The rear of the car is unstable due to a lack of rear-tire grip caused by too much front downforce or not enough rear downforce. Also known as “oversteer.”

Pushing - The car does not want to turn in the corners due to a lack of tire grip. This can be caused by a lack of downforce on the front of the car or too much downforce on the rear of the car. Also known as “understeer” and “tight.”

Race Gear - A high gear that is reserved for chasing down competitors or running without the benefit of slipstream. Uses more fuel due to higher revolutions per minute. Also known as a "go" gear.

Splash-and-Dash - A late-race pit stop in which the team adds just enough fuel to make it to the finish. Also known as a Splash-and-Go.

Stagger - Right-front and/or right-rear tire is larger in diameter than left-side tires in order to improve turning ability on ovals.

Tight - Also known as “understeer.” A handling condition characterized by a lack of grip in the front tires. As the driver steers through a turn, the front wheels want to continue straight ahead.

Tow/drafting - As a car moves around the track at high speed, it literally splits the air, some of which goes over the car, and some of which goes beneath. This lack of air behind the car creates a vacuum, which a trailing car may use to be pulled, or “towed,” by the lead car.  Also known as slipstreaming.

Wash out - A condition where the front wings of one car following another cannot produce adequate downforce; this is due to the "dirty air" tumbling off the lead car. As a result, the following car understeers in turns, requiring a change in driving approach. 

Wicker bill - A long, narrow, removable spoiler made of steel or aluminum on the trailing edge of the front and rear wings which varies in height, creating downforce. Teams will use different sized wicker bills to create more or less downforce. The larger (higher) the wicker bill, the greater the downforce, and vice versa for smaller wicker bills. Also known as a "Gurney flap."

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Bob Holada
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Location : Fort Wayne, Indiana
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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Sun 26 Jun 2016 - 21:34

I'm fairly comfortable with how to load setups, and changing settings and saving setups.  But what I haven't found yet is how to tell the current temperatures of my tires after a number of laps. I was expecting to find someplace in the Garage where I would see the temps, but I haven't found it yet.   I understand that there are add-on HUD's that may give me that info.  But which HUD do the ChampCar crowd like?  I also saw a reference to tire wear.  Other than the feel of the car is there anyway to get a reading on tire wear?
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Alberto Ibañez
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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Sun 26 Jun 2016 - 22:01

You can see the tire temps in the garage when you exit the track in default rfactor, they appera in teh center on the car silhouette between the suspension settings Wink .

Regarding your other question: get the XD hud, simple, uncluttered, customizable. :top:

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"There are two kind of oval racers, those who have hit the wall and those who will hit it" - Mario Andretti

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Alberto Ibañez
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Registration date : 2010-09-17

PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Tue 6 Sep 2016 - 19:22

A good piece of reading: Emerson Fittipaldi on oval racing

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"There are two kind of oval racers, those who have hit the wall and those who will hit it" - Mario Andretti

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Scott Urick
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PostSubject: Re: Oval racing tips/advice/technical   Wed 7 Sep 2016 - 4:05

Bob, you can also cycle your HUD to show performance/temps/wear values on the same window where you see the pit menu during your run.

Personally, I use XD (an overlay) so I can keep the HUD window on the ranking/gaps window and the pit menu when needed. But, if you go with XD, don't wait until the last minute as the position settings require manual adjustment in pixels and you must close the game completely whenever you want to make a change.
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